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Posts from the ‘Retirement Planning’ Category

22
Mar

Canada Pension Plan – Should You Take it Early?

The new rules governing CPP were introduced in 2012 and they take full effect in 2016.  The earliest you can take your CPP Pension is age 60, the latest is 70. The standard question regarding CPP remains the same – should I take it early or wait?

While you can elect to start receiving CPP at age 60, the discount rate under the new rules has increased.  Starting in 2016, your CPP income will be reduced by 0.6% each month you receive your benefit prior to age 65.  In other words, electing to take your CPP at age 60 will provide an income of 36% less than if you waited until age 65.

CPP benefits may also be delayed until age 70 so conversely, as of 2016, delaying your CPP benefits after age 65 will result in an increased income of 0.7% for each month of deferral.  At age 70, the retiree would have additional monthly income of 42% over that what he or she would have had at 65 and approximately 120% more than taking the benefit at age 60.  The question now becomes, “how long do you think you will live?” Read more »

19
Feb

Make the Most of Your Registered Retirement Savings Plan

The 2014 Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) contribution deadline is Monday, March 2, 2015. Here are some facts about RRSPs to help you make the most of this great opportunity to grow your retirement savings, better plan your personal taxes, and enjoy a comfortable retirement.

Make your maximum contribution

Your RRSP contributions provide a deduction from your taxable income, which for most, results in a tax refund when you file your personal tax return.

For 2014, you can contribute a maximum of 18% of your earned income in 2013, to a maximum of $24,270. Refer to your 2013 notice of assessment as you may have additional unused carry forward limit.  

This number will be adjusted if you are a member of pension plans and/or profit sharing plans, depending on the value of your benefits in the previous year.

Making the maximum contribution at the beginning of each year will add additional compounding power to your RRSP. Read more »

20
Dec

Segregated Funds: Investing With A Safety Net

Investing today is not for the faint of heart.  Fortunately for Canadians, segregated fund products offered by many life insurance companies provide a safety net for nervous investors.

Segregated Fund products present some interesting opportunities for people looking to get more security in their investment portfolios without sacrificing their potential for growth.

Read more »

19
Feb

TFSA or RRSP?

Lately, one question clients are asking me is whether they should contribute to a Tax Free Savings Account (TFSA) or a Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP)?  Personally, I really like the TFSA. however it doesn’t have to be an either or choice.  Why not do both?  If both, in what proportion should you divide your contributions?  In order to make an informed decision, let’s quickly review the main features of each program as discussed in last month’s article.  I will use bullets to illustrate the features as nothing gets people’s attention more than bullets.

TAX FREE SAVINGS ACCOUNT

  •  Any Canadian resident age 18 or over may open a TFSA. Contribution is not based on earned income.  There is no maximum age for contribution.
  • Maximum contribution is $5,000 for each year from 2009 to 2012 and must be made by December 31st of the year of contribution.  For 2013, due to indexing the maximum contribution is $5,500.
  • There is carry forward room for each year in which the maximum contribution was not made.
  • The deposit is not tax deductible, but the funds accumulate with no income tax payable on growth.
  • Withdrawals may be made at any time on an income tax free basis.  Withdrawals create additional deposit room commencing in the year after withdrawal.

Read more »